peace

Making Peace

Making Peace

    “If it is possible, as far as it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.” Romans 12:18

Peace is an elusive commodity in our world.

Turn on the news and you’ll be bombarded with stories of strife and discord: wars, protests, political clashes, interpersonal conflicts.

Maintaining peace with others can seem like an impossible aspiration when there are so many forces working against it.

Yet as followers of Christ, we are called to “make every effort” to live at peace (Hebrews 12:14). This directive in Romans 12 makes clear our responsibility.

Peacemaking must begin with us, regardless of others’ attitudes and actions. We are to do all we can to promote peace.

Removing Barriers

Making peace requires examining our own hearts.

Do we harbor bitterness, nurse grudges, gossip, or cast judgment on others?

These destroy relationships and grieve the Holy Spirit. God wants us to take responsibility for removing inner barriers that hinder peace.

As we surrender past hurts to the Lord and walk in forgiveness, it clears away debris that chokes relationships.

Praying blessings over those who have wronged us cultivates empathy and softens hardened hearts.

And asking God to refine our speech and filter our words prevents many conflicts from igniting in the first place.

Depositing Seeds of Peace

Once inner walls come down through dealing with our own hearts, we can turn outward and actively deposit seeds of peace.

This starts with modeling qualities that defuse tension like patience, kindness, and self-control.

Taming our tongue and not returning insult for insult deprives quarrels of oxygen.

Lovingly confronting issues in their early stages, before they intensify, can prevent ruptured relationships.

Seeking to truly understand others’ perspectives rather than forcing our opinions fosters mutual edification.

God’s Peace in Us

Of course, living at peace is not fully up to us. We will encounter people who are difficult, divisive or downright antagonistic.

As much as it depends on us, we should pursue peace while trusting God with results that are out of our control.

And we can take comfort that God’s peace in our hearts is not contingent on perfect relationships.

By drawing near to Jesus, the Prince of Peace, we tap into a wellspring of serenity that transcends circumstances.

His Spirit calms anxious thoughts, soothing relational tensions. Even when surrounded by hostility and chaos, we can know God’s peace guarding our hearts and minds (Philippians 4:7).

Agents of Reconciliation

God calls peacemakers His children and tasks us with spreading peace in our spheres of influence (Matthew 5:9).

As ambassadors of reconciliation, we bring the ministry entrusted to us – one conversation, act of forgiveness, gesture of goodwill at a time (2 Corinthians 5:18-19).

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Posted by onthesolidrock in Daily Inspiration
Relationships

Relationships

In Titus 3:10, we find a short and potent verse that offers guidance on how to handle difficult situations within our Christian community.

“Warn a divisive person once, and then warn them a second time. After that, have nothing to do with them.”

Addressing Division in the Church

This verse addresses a common issue in the life of a faith community: division and dissension.

The Apostle Paul advises Titus, a trusted church leader, on how to handle those who continually sow discord among believers. It begins with a process of reconciliation and correction.

Principle of Restoration

The first step is to warn the divisive individual. This isn’t done out of anger or condemnation but with the hope of restoration.

The aim is to help them recognize the harm their actions or attitudes are causing and encourage them to mend their ways, fostering unity within the church.

Protecting the Unity of the Church

If the person persists in causing division after a second warning, Paul advises that the church should distance itself from them.

This isn’t about exclusion but rather about protecting the unity and peace of the church. Sometimes, such separation is necessary to prevent the poison of division from spreading.

Application for Our Lives

As you reflect on Titus 3:10, consider your role in maintaining unity within your Christian community.

  • Are you contributing to peace and harmony, or are your actions divisive?
  • When faced with discord, do you follow the biblical principles of warning, correction, and, if necessary, separation, with the ultimate goal of restoration and unity?

This verse reminds you of the importance of addressing division with grace and wisdom, seeking the well-being of our faith communities.

Posted by onthesolidrock in Daily Inspiration
Living in the Kingdom

Living in the Kingdom

In Romans 14:17, the Apostle Paul unveils a profound truth about the Kingdom of God that resonates with the core of Christian living.

“For the kingdom of God is not a matter of eating and drinking, but of righteousness, peace, and joy in the Holy Spirit.”

Nature of God’s Kingdom

Paul begins by clarifying the nature of God’s Kingdom. It’s not about external rituals or regulations, like what we eat or drink.

Instead, the essence of the kingdom resides in internal realities. This understanding challenges the legalistic tendencies that can sometimes hinder our faith.

Righteousness, Peace, and Joy

The heart of this verse lies in the three pillars of God’s kingdom: righteousness, peace, and joy:

  • Righteousness refers to our right standing with God through Christ.
  • Peace signifies the reconciliation we have with God, resulting in inner and outer harmony.
  • Joy is the natural outflow of our relationship with the Holy Spirit, bringing delight even amidst life’s challenges.

In the Holy Spirit

Paul emphasizes that this righteousness, peace, and joy are found “In the Holy Spirit.” It’s a reminder that the Christian life isn’t merely about moral efforts but is profoundly influenced by the presence and work of the Spirit in our lives.

The Holy Spirit empowers us to live out the values of God’s kingdom.

Apply It

As you contemplate on Romans 14:17; evaluate your priorities.

  • Are you overly fixated on external religious practices or legalistic rules?
  • Are you experiencing the transformative power of righteousness, peace, and joy that comes from living in God’s kingdom?

Focus on the heart of your faith, cultivate a life marked by these attributes, empowered by the Holy Spirit.

Posted by onthesolidrock in Daily Inspiration
Unity and Peace

Unity and Peace

Ephesians 4:3 highlights the importance of unity among believers and emphasizes the need to preserve the bond of peace:

“Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.”

This verse encourages us to actively pursue and protect the unity that is brought about by the Holy Spirit in the body of Christ. It reminds us that unity is not passive but requires intentional effort and a commitment to maintaining peace among fellow believers. It serves as a reminder of the essential role we play in fostering unity and creating an atmosphere of harmony within the church.

Unity of the Spirit

Ephesians 4:3 refers to the unity of the Spirit, emphasizing that unity is not something we can manufacture on our own. It is a work of the Holy Spirit in the hearts of believers.

The Spirit unites us as one body in Christ, transcending our differences in culture, background, and personal preferences. This unity is founded on our shared faith in Jesus Christ and our common purpose of glorifying Him.

It is a powerful testimony to the world of God’s love and transformative power at work in our lives. As believers, we are called to cherish and protect this unity, recognizing its significance and the Spirit’s role in establishing it.

Bond of Peace

The verse also highlights the bond of peace as the glue that holds the unity of the Spirit together. Peace is not merely the absence of conflict but the presence of harmony, reconciliation, and a genuine concern for one another’s well-being.

It involves a willingness to pursue reconciliation, forgiveness, and understanding in our relationships. As members of the body of Christ, we are called to actively maintain this bond of peace, being peacemakers and agents of reconciliation.

It requires humility, patience, and a commitment to the values of love and grace. By prioritizing peace, we create an environment where unity can thrive and God’s purposes can be fulfilled.

Making Every Effort

Ephesians 4:3 exhorts us to make “every effort” to keep the unity of the Spirit. This implies that unity requires intentional action on our part.

We are called to actively work towards unity, resolving conflicts, promoting understanding, and seeking reconciliation when disagreements arise. It involves humility, gentleness, and a willingness to listen and understand different perspectives.

Making every effort to keep unity requires selflessness, setting aside personal agendas and preferences for the greater good of the Body of Christ. It is a constant pursuit that requires ongoing commitment and diligence.

Value and protect the unity that God has established among believers, recognizing it as a gift from the Holy Spirit. Actively work towards maintaining peace, pursuing reconciliation, and fostering an atmosphere of love and harmony.

Posted by onthesolidrock in Daily Inspiration
RACE – ism

RACE – ism

I am perplexed by the recent “woke-ness” inside the church; as if all of a sudden the church realizes that racial inequality, unfairness, and privilege, is something new and appalling.

I notice many church leaders jumping wholeheartedly into the narrative being portrayed by an ungodly media (pick your poison, right or left) whose very lifeblood is derived from hate, anger and animosity.

Many folks who have addressed, and consistently address, the ongoing issues of racism, are being made to feel guilt, shame, and embarrassment for not doing enough.

As Christian leaders, we are supposed to believe the Gospel message; and should have been “born again” of the Spirit long ago, and awakened to the injustice of racism early. One of the first issues a Christian leader MUST come to terms with, is the issue of race-ism.

The Bible is very clear:

James 2:8-9

“If, however, you are fulfilling the royal law according to the Scripture, “You shall love your neighbor as yourself,” you are doing well. But if you show partiality, you are committing sin and are convicted by the law as transgressors.”

Leviticus 19:33-34

“When a stranger resides with you in your land, you shall not do him wrong. The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as the native among you, and you shall love him as yourself, for you were aliens in the land of Egypt; I am the Lord your God.”

Colossians 3:9-11

 “Do not lie to one another, since you laid aside the old self with its evil practices, and have put on the new self who is being renewed to a true knowledge according to the image of the One who created him— a renewal in which there is no distinction between Greek and Jew, circumcised and uncircumcised, barbarian, Scythian, slave and freeman, but Christ is all, and in all.”

The Scriptures mentioned here are only but a few of many that show there is ONE Body in Christ, and there are NO RACIAL distinctions whatsoever.

Please, allow me to share my own journey as I negotiated the issue of racism in a small, white community, in rural America.

I did not encounter any racism being expressed in my home, as a matter of fact, I recall my father telling of a black man he had met while working for a paving company in the area; they were good friends, and he always spoke kindly of him; often highlighting the grief his friend faced at the hands of other men.

It was in school, when the issue of racism began to present its ugly head. Our “white” community had only one black family, and the kids were mercilessly mocked and ridiculed in school.

On more than one occasion I would see a young black child weeping in a corner after being verbally and physically abused by a group of bullies.

I began to understand that racism is taught to children and usually it is taught in the home.

Nearly 20 years after high school, through an amazing set of circumstances, my wife and I came to faith in Christ, and in 1995, I was appointed as pastor, and I would serve two small churches, one in my hometown, and another church in a smaller community 16 miles away.

The little church in my hometown, had a beautiful white piano, with a name inscribed on a brass tag; “In Loving Memory – James Carter” I always wondered who he was.

It was not long after my pastoral ministry began, that I noticed the racial slurs some of the people in my churches were using; I did not like it, and I knew God wanted me to address it; I was at a loss to know how.

One day, the matriarch of the only black family in our town came to church; she was a stunningly beautiful woman, she wore a white dress, her hair meticulously styled, and as she walked in, all eyes were on her.

I knew her name was Lois; I had gone to school with her son; we were in the same class. I introduced myself after church and told her I was so glad she came. As we talked, she told me that she used to attend this church, but had not been there for a few years and wanted to “check it out” as some of her grandchildren attended Sunday school here.

Later on, she would share with me that her husband had tragically died some years ago, and that the white piano in the front of the church, was donated in his name; I was stunned!

I began to spend more and more time getting to know Lois, we would talk on and on after church and at various church functions where she would attend. I began to learn the depths of her pain; having raised her family in a very racist community. I will share the depths of those racist roots in a few moments.

I can remember asking her how she would like to be addressed; as in African American, or a black woman. She responded to me that she was not born in Africa, nor were her parents born there, so she is not African.

She also said that just like there are different colors of white people, there are different colors of black people too. She told me that she just prefers to be called a woman of color.

I felt it was time to address the issue of racism in our church and I asked Lois if she would help me. I told her that it would require a great deal of courage on her part, but I felt God was leading us to do it; so with great trepidation, she said yes.

On the following Sunday morning, as our church gathered, I had taken one of the extra large pulpit chairs and placed it in the front center of the church, right near the altar. After a few songs were sung, I stepped up to the pulpit and began to address the issue of racism.

I shared how prevalent it was in our community; but I was more concerned how widespread it was inside our own church, and that it was time dealt with it. You could feel the tension; it was palpable!

After a few passages of Scripture, like the ones shared earlier in this article, I asked Lois if she would please come and sit in the chair. She took a deep breath and came forward and sat down.

I began to address the congregation of about 60 or so and I asked a few pointed questions:

  • Did you ever listen to, and then laugh at, a racially charged story or joke?

 

  • When you were at the grocery store and needed something in aisle 3, but noticed Lois was there, did you avoid her and go over to aisle 4 instead, so as not to be seen socializing with her in public?

 

These questions, along with a few others, caused great conviction upon the congregation; tears began to fall. I told the folks that they now had an opportunity to make it right, a time to ask forgiveness, a time to heal.

One by one, with tears and sobbing, as our pianist played the piano dedicated to the memory of her husband, people came forward, asking Lois for forgiveness; it was one of the most powerful moments I have ever been involved in.

Later the next year, my mother, passed away. Mom was my confidant, I could go to her with any problem; she never judged me, always hoped for me, and loved me unconditionally! Her passing affected me deeply, and I missed her so much.

I recall about a year after my mom passed away, I was sitting with Lois having early morning coffee with her at her home. She had invited me to come have coffee with her in the mornings, and we would talk and pray together.

As I sat there, I looked over at Lois and began to share with her how much I missed my mom. I told her some of the fond stories I remembered, and how much my mom had impacted my life.

I was overcome with emotion and I looked at Lois and I asked her: “Lois, I need a mom in my life, someone who will listen to me without judging, who loves me without conditions . . . Lois, would you be my mom?”

Big tears began to roll down her beautiful face and she reached across the table and grabbed my hands, and she said; “I would love to be your mom”, and then she said; “but oh I love my children!”

In 2000, our little church bought an old school building and we moved into it. Lois came along too, and so did some of her children and grandchildren. I wanted our church to be a safe place for her and for anyone else who felt disenfranchised by this cruel world.

As we began ministry in the old school; I came across some old newspaper articles and I read the story of the dedication of the old school in 1924.

It seems that the school did not have the money to purchase an American flag and the area Ku Klux Klan stepped in and offered to buy the flag, and the school accepted the offer!

Once again, we took the initiative to renounce that offer and we pushed back the racial hatred foisted on a community nearly 100 years ago!

Several years later, we had a Navajo Evangelist by the name of TH Lee, come to our church for a week of meetings. As I prayed for these meetings I was reminded how in the late 1700’s a party of white men, came to an Indian Village near Sinnemahoning, a town in our county, and there killed a small village of Native American Indians.

As we were getting ready to kick off a week of meetings Sunday morning with our Native American friend; God spoke loudly to me. It was ten minutes before the service began and God said: “Get a shovel and go out to the front yard of the church and bring in a section of sod.”

So, I ran quickly to the tool room, grabbed a shovel, and in my suit I ran out to the front yard and began to dig; I carefully cut out a rectangular piece of sod. Directly across the yard is a large Catholic church with dozens of people looking curiously at me, digging in the front yard in my suit on Sunday morning!

I took the sod inside and placed it on a silver plated platter. As I got ready to introduce the guest Navajo speaker, I shared with the congregation about the way our county got started; by the killing of American Indians!

With tears streaming, I gave the “land” back to our Native American friend, and I asked him to forgive us, and to bless our land! With tears streaming down his face, he forgave us, and blessed our land!

Over the course of ministry in that small, mostly white community, I did not tolerate racism coming from anyone in the church.

If I heard racially charged language I would shut it down, and if it persisted, I would ask the person(s) to leave. Remember, you get what you tolerate, and there are some things worth going to the wall over, and this is one of them!

So when I hear pastors and leaders today, jumping on the band-wagon so to speak; saying all the right things, denouncing racism, as they should, the inequality facing minority people of any color, class or creed, I applaud; but I also say; what took you so long!

You are NEVER going to change the sinful nature of broken humanity, apart from the Power and Presence of God Himself. Oh, it would be wonderful if we could cause sinful man to act godly, if we could jump in with the worldly and turn their hearts, convincing them to be nice and kind to one another.

Your flavor of politics is NOT going to help; throwing your money and voice behind anarchistic ventures won’t help . . . so what will?

You are supposed to be salt and light to a broken dying world.

Matthew 5:13-16

“You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has become tasteless, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled under foot by men.

“You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden; nor does anyone light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven.”

Repent, YOU repent!

Please don’t waste your time telling others to do it if you won’t! It will ONLY start if you start! Once you deal with YOU, then you can become part of the solution to the problem; otherwise YOU are the problem.

Matthew 7:3-5

Why do you look at the speck that is in your brother’s eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye?  Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ and behold, the log is in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the log out of your own eye, and then you will see clearly to take the speck out of your brother’s eye.

I could tell stories of churches where racism is no longer tolerated; where diversity abounds and the differences in race and color are beautiful to behold.

Racism is the topic of the day right now; next month perhaps it will be climate change, or perhaps back to the virus, or the perils of capitalism, or socialism, or whatever “ism” that suits the insatiable desire of sinful humanity to garner support, money, and perhaps a little fame.

As Christians we would be wise to remain steadfast in our convictions, resisting the knee-jerk reaction the world so fervently desires from us. God’s Word remains true; He remains faithful, and we must hold fast to Him.

Your faith in Jesus is about to be tested in ways you never imagined, and the temptation to buy into the worlds wisdom will be very strong; resist it!

Remember this one thing: “Either the church will disciple the world, or the world will disciple the church”

Take a few minutes today and carefully read John 15 again and let Jesus own words strengthen you.

An old familiar hymn comes to mind for times such as these . . .

 

In Times Like These

In times like these you need a Savior,

In times like these you need an anchor;

Be very sure, be very sure,

Your anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

This Rock is Jesus, Yes He’s the One,

This Rock is Jesus, the only One;

Be very sure, be very sure,

Your anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

In times like these you need the Bible,

In times like these, O be not idle;

Be very sure, be very sure,

Your anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

This Rock is Jesus, Yes He’s the One,

This Rock is Jesus, the only One;

Be very sure, be very sure,

Your anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

In times like these I have a Savior,

In times like these I have an anchor;

I’m very sure, I’m very sure

My anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

This Rock is Jesus, Yes He’s the One,

This Rock is Jesus, the only One;

Be very sure, be very sure,

Your anchor holds and grips the Solid Rock!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted by onthesolidrock in Faith, Holiness, Humility, Prayer, 0 comments
Grace, Mercy and Peace to You

Grace, Mercy and Peace to You

“To Timothy my true son in the faith: Grace, mercy and peace from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord”.   1 Timothy 1:2

 While reading the letters that the apostle Paul wrote, I noticed that almost every letter he wrote began with those words; “Grace and peace to you from God the Father and Jesus Christ our Lord.” In the letters written to Timothy, and to Titus, he includes grace, mercy and peace.

Like many of you, I have read these books written by Paul, dozens of times, and always seemed to overlook the opening greeting, as if it were not that important.

What jumps out at me, is the way Paul says these words. It is bold, and up front, like he was an emissary of God, coming to the people, as if he had just come from God himself. Kind of like an ambassador, proclaiming the heart of the kingdom represented.

I get this picture in my mind of a rider on a horse, riding feverishly through the night, with a message of hope for those in distress; perhaps soldiers, weary from battle, which may need some encouragement.

The rider dismounts, and comes to the people, and the first words out of his mouth are; Grace, Mercy, and Peace to you from your King! How very refreshing and encouraging to hear.

Paul gives us that kind of feeling when he begins his letters, regardless of the content of the letter, he set us as ease, with the reassurance that he has just come from God himself, and God has given a message to His people, “Grace, Mercy, and Peace from God our Father, and Christ Jesus our Lord.”

Paul chose these words, because he himself was the recipient of them. Paul was a persecutor of the church. He actually chased down Christians, and standing by as they were put to death.

He was actively destroying the very church that Jesus was trying to build. Paul was on a mission to destroy, what he thought was an abomination to God.

Paul knew that he deserved death for what he had done; no question about it; standing by, as saints like Stephen were being, stoned to death, cheering the crowd.

Paul knew that he was an enemy of God, but now, through God’s grace and mercy, he found peace; joy inexpressible! How could he contain it?

Paul was able to express this in almost every letter he wrote, because it was what he received, and it was so valuable to him. He wanted to express it every time he wrote.

Like Paul, you and I received Grace, Mercy, and Peace from God too, and like Paul, we have the authority to declare it to others as well.

So the next time you enter a room with your brothers and sisters in Christ be bold, and with confidence declare, Grace, Peace and Mercy to you from God our Father through Jesus Christ our Lord!

Posted by onthesolidrock in Faith, Holiness, Humility, Thankfulness, Trust, 0 comments
Adopted

Adopted

If you ever wondered about God’s love for you, consider the language the apostle Paul uses to describe the relationship between God and you; he declared we are, adopted.

Adoption –      “To take into one’s family through legal means and raise, as one’s own child”

“The adopted child is treated by law, as the natural child of the adopting parents, upon the entry of the final adoption decree. The adopted child, therefore, gains the right to inherit from the adoptive parents and adoptive parents’ relatives. . .”

(Adoption Information Clearinghouse)

 

For he chose us in him before the creation of the world to be holy and blameless in his sight. In love he predestined us for adoption to sonship through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will— to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves.     Ephesians 1:4-6

Posted by onthesolidrock in Faith, Family, Thankfulness, Trust, 0 comments
I am an Alien

I am an Alien

It took a few years to come to this conclusion; but I am convinced that; “I am an alien.”  I know, you are probably rolling your eyes right now thinking; “Rock has finally gone off his ROCK-er.”

 

Perhaps I have, but allow me to explain . . .

 

It is no big secret that I am an unashamed follower of Jesus. I am not perfect on my journey with Him, however, I do spend quality time with Him and truly call Him my best Friend. The friendship I am speaking of took a while to develop and was entirely His own idea.

 

Many years ago, through an amazing set of circumstances, I came to the realization that I was a spiritual mess. After chasing drugs, money and other worthless “things,” I found myself faced with a decision to either believe in God, or walk away, rejecting Him, along with His offer of redemption.

 

I recall kneeling at an altar in an old barn type building one hot July night, where they were holding “religious services.” I risked everything and went to Him; afraid He would reject me, afraid of what people would say, afraid of my own fallibilities.

 

As I knelt there, tears flowing, I said to God; “I have nothing to give you, nothing at all.” At that moment, I heard the kindest voice say; “I’ll take it.”

 

It was there, in that hot building, with dozens of hopeful people looking on, that my friendship with Jesus began. Amazingly, on the other side of that altar, was my wife, Sherri, having a similar experience and she also became a friend of Jesus that night!

 

It took no time at all for this relationship with Jesus to really get moving. He introduced me to His Father, and to the Holy Spirit, who would come and live constantly with me, helping me, teaching me and directing my steps!

 

As I alluded to in the beginning of this writing, I did not, and still do not, always get it right. There have been some tumultuous times in our friendship. We have had serious disagreements, we have laughed together, wept together, and there have been times when I thought the relationship might be irrevocably damaged; not on His part, but mine!

 

The thing is; this friendship with Jesus is so much more. When He introduced me to His Father, there was a celebration and according to God’s own Word; I became adopted into His family . . . WHAT?

 

Colossians 1:13-14

“For he has rescued us from the dominion of darkness and brought us into the kingdom of the Son he loves, in whom we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins”                        

 

I was rescued from the darkness and brought into His Kingdom! This is not a fantasy show; this is a spiritual reality, but it gets even better!

 

According to God’s Word, not only have I been rescued, I have been adopted as a son! Seriously? The Bible says . . .

 

Romans 8:15

For you have not received a spirit of slavery leading to fear again, but you have received a spirit of adoption as sons by which we cry out, “Abba! Father!”

 

Check this out about what adoption rights are . . .

 

Adoption –   “To take into one’s family through legal means and raise as one’s own child”

The adopted child is treated by law as the natural child of the adopting parents, upon the entry of the final adoption decree. The adopted child, therefore, gains the right to inherit from the adoptive parents and adoptive parents’ relatives. . .     (National Adoption Information Clearinghouse)

 

So . . . there you have it! I am now a permanent citizen of the Kingdom of God! How amazing is that! As an adopted son, now living in “The Kingdom of God” it behooves me to learn all I can about my new home and to live in such a manner as to reflect my gratitude for this amazing gift!

 

As I have studied the ways of His “Kingdom” I have come to the realization that it truly is my spiritual home; I reside there NOW! I don’t have to die to get there!

 

One thing we learn quickly as an adopted son or daughter is that, God our Father, along with the Son (Jesus) and The Holy Spirit, is on a mission. Furthermore, those who are adopted into this family of God, are invited to join in this mission and are expected to wholeheartedly engage in it!

 

For this reason, we are “sent” to the world, to express Kingdom ideas such as; love, peace, joy, salvation, forgiveness, kindness. We are here as missionaries; we are not of this world . . . still not convinced?

 

Listen to the words of Jesus Himself as He prays to His Father and ours in the Gospel of John . . .

 

John 17:13-18

But now I come to You, and these things I speak in the world so that they may have My joy made full in themselves. I have given them Your word; and the world has hated them, because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world. I do not ask You to take them out of the world, but to keep them from the evil one. They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world. Sanctify them in the truth; Your word is truth. As You sent Me into the world, I also have sent them into the world.

 

So there it is . . . I am an alien; I come from another place, I am not of this world!       SWEET!

 

Posted by onthesolidrock in Faith, 0 comments